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Heavy Electricity Studio Documentary

7 Days and nights of tracking got Heavy Electricity onto tape and this is how it happened. Deaf Bros are truly buzzed to be part of this record. “It was our pleasure to work on this with all involved, especially

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The Fire Note reviews Heavy Electricity

Some bands like to impress you with their vast knowledge of various and sundry musical genres in a culmination of years and years of crate digging self-gratification. And then there’s Dublin Ireland’s No Spill Blood (whose name either an allusion…

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Some bands like to impress you with their vast knowledge of various and sundry musical genres in a...

Some bands like to impress you with their vast knowledge of various and sundry musical genres in a culmination of years and years of crate digging self-gratification. And then there’s Dublin Ireland’s No Spill Blood (whose name either an allusion to The Island Of Dr. Moreau or an Oingo Boingo song – take your pick.) They come at you like a herd of buffalo snorting and charging with thunderous rhythms, full-on aggression and taking no prisoners in the process. There is no let down, no chance to catch your breath. There are also no guitars. Just vocals, bass, drums and synths. But the noise they produce is as heavy as any metal band around. There’s always a chance that something this kitschy could fall flat on its face. After all, this has been done before (Death From Above 1979?). But, as always, what makes Heavy Electricity interesting is the songs. It’s always about the songs, man.

The sludge-synth sound of lead-off track “White Out” is a really good indication of what this band does and does well. The bass guitar serves as a lead instrument in that it is riff-heavy. Singer/bass player Matt Hedigan growls and groans in a post-hardcore voice that gives No Spill Blood a slasher movie soundtrack feel. Other tracks such as “Back To The Earth” recall Red Fang in their ability to take simple riffs and run with them. All three members of No Spill Blood are scene vets and this helped them procure none other than Mike Watt from Minutemen fame for a vocal turn on “Now II.” It’s the longest song here and also the scariest. A krautrock beat from drummer Lar Kaye accompanies Ruadhan O’Meara’s octave-loving keyboards in an orgy of brutal techno-metal.(Note: Kaye has since been replaced by Ror Conaty.). I can’t help thinking of Killing Joke at their manic best. Also present are undertones of Italian Prog band Goblin – a band ,fittingly enough, known primarily for their horror movie soundtracks.

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No Spill Blood Interview and Review of Heavy Electricity on Bearded Gentlemen

The music of No Spill Blood is intense. Pounding swells of noise, swift tempo changes, distorted jagged vocals, a pulsating bass that would knock all the Pantera posters off your walls, all while simultaneously filling your brain with swirling sci-fi synths. The tracks on their new album, Heavy Electricity, vary from plodding rhythm sections that build up momentum and layers of ethereal sounds before violently cascading into astral pandemonium (“Now II” and “White Out”), to songs that put the probe up your ass faster than the craftiest of extraterrestrials (“El Duurto”), to tracks where the synths are doing all the flexing, sending your brain onto a space mission into the most phantasmagorical and psychedelic of galaxies (“Heavy Electricity” and “Endless Drift”).

It is hard to categorize this band, which is generally a good thing, and this makes No Spill Blood’s sound accessible to a variety of audiences, ranging from metal to noise-rock, space rock, post hardcore, etc. I recommend Heavy Electricity to anyone that is in the mood for something heavy that isn’t your run of the mill.

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SPIN Debuts No Spill Blood Track "Harsh Route"

Dublin trio No Spill Blood takes their name from the same H.G. Wells passage as Devo, and their press release even describes their shared love of “smarmy synths.” That’s about where the similarities end between the two. In their most…