Atsuo - Drums and Vocals

Wata - Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals

Takeshi - Bass, Guitar, Vocals

Atsuo - Drums and Vocals

Wata - Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals

Takeshi - Bass, Guitar, Vocals

B O R I S 
 
World Wide Management 
 Manager - Tadashi Hamada

Label - Sargent House
Label - Marc Jetton & Cathy Pellow

Music Licensing - Marc Jetton 

N. American Press
Publicist - Stephanie Marlow

UK/EU Press - Rarely Unable
Publicist - Lauren Barley

N. American Booking - Flower Booking
Agent - Mahmood Shaikh

European Booking - Northern Music
Agent - Haydn Britland


WORLDWIDE $ STORE // UK £ STORE

B
ORISHEAVYROCKS.COM

BORIS - Tour Dates

NEWS

The Art Of Heavy: An Interview with BORIS // PUREGRAINAUDIO 

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Full article via Pure Grain Audio

This week, two metal titans – Boris of Japan and Amenraof Belgium – embark on a co-headlining tour of Europe. Both are bands known for their intense music and equally intense live shows – albeit in different ways – with a wealth of material behind them and a core of dedicated listeners. Boris celebrated their twenty-fifth anniversary last year with the album DEAR, a celebration of all things Boris, and a glorious final statement from the band. Amenra, too, are approaching their second decade as a band, maintaining a steady and consistent creative output through personal turmoil and band member side-projects. Last year’s Mass VI is as emotionally heavy and soul-bearing as any of the project’s works; more than any band, Amenra channel their strength through hardship. With the first date of the tour on the horizon, Takeshi of Boris and Colin H. van Eeckhout of Amenra kindly took the time to answer questions I had for them about their bands’ legacies, creative processes and their relationship with each other.

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Interview:Boris // ATTN:Magazine 

Full article via ATTN:Magazine

I am forever captivated by Boris. I can’t think of many other bands that harness such a playful relationship with identity and legacy, either by releasing records that run against the trajectory of their previous work – such as those inexplicable turns into pop or bursts of psychedelic punk – or by tampering with their own discography, putting out drastically different versions of the same record, or recycling their own album titles to obscure all attempts to trace their chronology. If there’s one central facet to the Japanese trio, it’s the notion of “heaviness”: the stretching of heaviness across crumbling guitar drones, the blizzards of heaviness that collide in their collaborations with Merzbow…even the palpable absence of heaviness that carries their detours into quieter, more shoegazing territory.

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